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KRISS USA, innovators of the Super V Recoil Mitigation System, is announcing the re-release of California Compliant KRISS® Vector GEN II firearms. These updated models will be available in all calibers and colors, and shipping to California dealers starting in April 2017, with an MSRP of $1,599. 00.

KRISS Vector pistol caliber carbines available for California as featureless rifles!

KRISS Vector pistol caliber carbines available for California as featureless rifles!KRISS USA, innovators of the Super V Recoil Mitigation System, is announcing the re-release of California Compliant KRISS® Vector GEN II firearms. These updated models will be available in all calibers and colors, and shipping to California dealers starting in April 2017, with an MSRP of $1,599.00. The 2017 California Compliant KRISS® Vector CRB features a fixed DEFIANCE® DS150 stock, giving the rifle an overall length of 36.5”, as well as a Kydex® grip wrap barrier. The California version of the Vector CRB is loaded through a ten round capacity GLOCK® magazine. Also included, for California models only, the KRISS® Picatinny Rail Cover Short (SKU: KVA-RCBL00S) and the KRISS® Picatinny Hand Stop (SKU: KVA-FGBL00) will be preinstalled factory accessories. Twenty California compliant KRISS® Vector CRBs will be available through five color and four caliber options. Color options include Black, Flat Dark Earth, OD Green, Combat Grey, and Alpine White. Caliber options include 9mm, .45ACP, 10mm and 40S&W. For more information about the California compliant KRISS® Vector CRB visit the KRISS USA website at www.kriss-usa.com . About KRISS USA KRISS USA is a leading manufacturer and distributor of small arms, training replicas, and accessories for commercial, military, and law enforcement users worldwide. KRISS USA is part of a group of companies that focus on delivering proprietary technologies to the firearms industry, enabling more efficient solutions and corresponding to the 21st century security requirements.

AR15 Accuracy: Shooting Sub MOA Groups

AR15 Accuracy: Shooting Sub MOA Groups

Does the lead photo make you feel a little crazy? Yea, me too… let’s see what it takes to shrink that group. First off: It takes lots of time and energy to chase sub-moa groups . It’s the nature of the beast. Precision is going to cost you time and/or money. Perhaps you like the challenge, or perhaps you just want to see what your shiny new AR15 is capable of. If you are chasing group size for any reason, I have a few tips that will hopefully cut some time out of your journey. Let’s start with the foundation of accurate shooting… Stability. Your shooting foundation: The only bench that’s any good is gonna be a THICC BOI. It’s vitally important for you to start with a strong foundation. The firmer the foundation, the better. Portable benches and your truck bed are okay for zeroing and casual shooting, but they will betray you for precision shooting. The wind is a big factor when shooting from your truck bed as the wrong position will lead to the wind pushing your vehicle subtly. It’s enough to push your reticle off target. The same goes for portable benches. I have a portable bench and I stopped using it when I noticed my heartbeat was causing movement as I tested loads. At 10x or more, every movement is noticeable. Unless the bench is made of concrete pillars and a slab, I shoot specifically prone on the ground. This removes the bench wobble factor from the equation and starts you off with a proper foundation. Rifle Legs: Pictured: A Magpul bipod on an Aero Precision M5E1. Your foundation is steady, so let’s examine what your rifle is using to interface with the foundation. Your firearm must be steady too, but you don’t have to go so far as needing a lead sled or some other mechanism. A bipod and a rear bag, when used appropriately, can offer all the support a shooter needs to pull sub-MOA. I have used Magpul and Harris style bipods, and I much prefer the simplicity of the Magpul setup, however, they both do an adequate job of stabilizing the front of your rifle. After the front of the rifle is taken care of, the rear needs attention. I suggest a rear squeeze bag . These bags are placed towards the toe of the stock and are used to tip the muzzle up or down by squeezing them with the support hand. I cannot emphasize enough how useful these are. If you are chasing groups or are just meticulous about your rifles zero, these need to be in your range bag considering how cheap they are. The rear bag is squeezed to raise or lower the muzzle with the support hand. With the rifle supported from a firm foundation and supported at two points, it’s time to move to the shooter. In line with the muzzle, rifle butt in the shoulder pocket, support arm squeezing the bag… At this point, I place my face on the stock and let my shoulder pocket and face apply full weight to the rear of the rifle. I then squeeze the rear bag to make my final elevation adjustments. The full weight of the shooter from the rear, while you squeeze the bag, compresses the squeeze bag media from the top, bottom, and sides. Depending on what’s in the bag, this can make everything in the bag settle into a firm rear foundation. As the Rifleman is in position, rifle firmly centered on target… It’s time to flick off the safety. Trust me. Trigger: The Wisconsin Trigger Co MkIII is a trigger made for competition or precision shooting. Adjustments are everywhere. The MK series of triggers are the original 2 stage AR15 trigger. The trigger is vitally important. When you’re in the zone, you only have a small window of opportunity to make a clean shot before something goes wrong. The sun, the wind picks up, your crotch has an itch, damn mosquitoes, etc. The last thing you need is a heavy trigger. A long heavy trigger pulls you out of focus as you are waiting for it to break and drop the hammer. A good shooter can overcome a crappy trigger, but it’s not ideal. Spend some money. At the bare minimum, get a Larue MBT or a Geissele G2S. I prefer a two-stage with a 1.5-2 lb second stage. Pre-loading the trigger will aid you as the 2nd stage wall will feel very light and crisp. A lighter trigger will let you make the shot when everything is in alignment and will break precisely when you want it to. Perfect. Did you take the safety off? Visual Patterns: Let’s also examine the target. I have had the best success with diamond style targets. A red diamond offers visual contrast against a black crosshair and the pattern is easy to align due to the diamond angles being bisected by the crosshair. Choosing a target like that should help you visually align everything in a repeatable manner. Groups Size: I can’t talk about shooting small groups without touching on group size. So bear with me. When its finally time to put rounds to paper, statistics don’t lie. 3 round groups are not statistically significant. Problem is that as we chase larger groups in our shooting session, things can go wrong. That mosquito bites your but and you pull a shot, the wind picks up, etc. So two five rounds groups averaged, or one good ten shot string will be enough to show us how effective the rifleman and rifle are with statistically significant results. You can see in the above target photo that using traditional group measurements I shot a .8 MOA ten shot group based on the two furthest points in the shot. Yet the mean radius measures .238 MOA meaning the average shot landed within .238 MOA of the group center.  Regardless of what measure you use, the group above is fire and it is statistically significant. Wrapping Up: You will know immediately if your shooting position is rock solid based on the tips above. Paste a target at 25 yards and practice stable shooting positions in the backyard. It’s easy to tighten your groups when you have a few inexpensive pieces of gear and know-how to apply it. We didn’t touch on ammo selection and optics, but if your chasing groups your going to have to experiment with different loads, or buy factory ammo such as FGMM. I use a 10x optic and that’s plenty for an AR15 but having a little more magnification doesn’t hurt when chasing groups. With a little preparation, you can evaluate what you, your rifle, and ammo are capable of… the performance a snapshot in time. To repeat it each time you shoot, now there’s the rub. Thanks for reading guys, please be sure to subscribe to our email list so you get updates when new articles hit. Next time we will move to the rifle itself and re-loads. -Lothaen out! Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Why National Concealed Carry Reciprocity Needs to Happen

Why National Concealed Carry Reciprocity Needs to Happen

Advertisment Concealed carry has been exploding for the last decade. More and more states are loosening their state’s gun laws and allowing your average everyday person to legally carry a gun. This increased interest and ability to carry a concealed firearm has led to an entirely new industry of firearms, training, and of course an interest in firearm laws. Concealed carry is regulated almost entirely by the states. All fifty states do issue concealed carry permits. The big difference comes in how the permits are regulated. States like Vermont are considered constitutional carry and do not require a permit to carry a firearm of any kind . California, on the other hand, requires a person to have a reason to be issued a permit, and they can be denied at the will of a bureaucrat. Being issued a permit in California varies greatly between different counties, and is typically very hard to get without having a lot of money or connections. All states issue their permits differently. Due to these massive differences between the way states issue concealed carry permits, reciprocity varies greatly. It can be one of the most difficult hurdles to clear. Contents What is Reciprocity? What is National Concealed Carry Reciprocity? Three Benefits of National Reciprocity: Benefit Number One – Legal Protection: Benefit Number Two – Self-Protection: Benefit Number Three – Freedom in Anti Gun States: One Major Caution: Parting Shots: What is Reciprocity? Reciprocity is defined as, ‘the practice of exchanging things with others for mutual benefit, especially privileges granted by one country or organization to another.’ When it comes to concealed carry reciprocity the term is applied to which states will accept permits from other states. For example, the state of Florida share reciprocity with over thirty states. Florida will share reciprocity with any state who will in turn share reciprocity with Florida. Another example is California; California does not accept permits for concealed carry for any other state. Therefore, no states share reciprocity with California. So even if a concealed carrier has a permit for Texas they cannot legally carry in California. If someone in Texas carries their concealed carry firearm in California they are violating the law and can be arrested, tried, and jailed. Remember, all states are different in whose permits they honor. Because of this traveling as a concealed carrier can be quite tricky. What is National "Concealed Carry Reciprocity" ? Conceal carry reciprocity is the ability to get a license to conceal carry in one state, and have that license be valid in other states. Imagine if a person wished to take a road trip across several states via the car they drive each and every day. Because states do not share reciprocity with other state’s drivers licenses the road tripper has to make sure they plan their road trip through states in which their license is accepted. Doesn’t that sound frustrating? That is what concealed carriers have to deal with when it comes to carrying a concealed handgun and having a license in their state. National reciprocity is the national recognition of concealed carry licenses across state lines. If National Concealed Carry reciprocity was to become law in the United States, then individual states would have to recognize concealed carry permits for many types of handguns , like your run of the mill 9mm or 22lr pistol . This will essentially make a concealed carry license work the same way a driver’s license works. "National Concealed Carry" reciprocity will not make it easier for someone in an anti-gun state to obtain a concealed carry permit. It will, however, allow someone with a concealed carry permit to legally carry in all 50 states. Three Benefits of National Reciprocity: Shaneen Allen is a nice young lady, a single mom, a hard worker, and nearly a convicted felon for crossing an imaginary line with her concealed carry license and handgun. Shaneen Allen was the victim of limited concealed carry reciprocity. As a Pennsylvania resident, she had a concealed carry permit. While traveling to work in New Jersey she was pulled over for an unsafe lane change. She informed the officer she was a Pennsylvania resident, had her concealed carry license, and a gun in the vehicle. She obtained her concealed carry because she had been robbed twice, and wanted to protect herself. She was arrested, sat in jail for 40 days before making bail, and faced a three-year mandatory prison sentence if she was convicted. This woman has zero criminal record , takes care of her two children, and had been the victim of a violent crime twice in her life. Yet she was facing a three-year prison sentence. She was fortunately pardoned for the crime by New Jersey’s governor. If National Concealed Carry reciprocity was in effect Miss Allen would have never been arrested, and never faced 40 days in jail for nothing. National concealed carry reciprocity would have protected her as she crossed imaginary state lines and allowed her to protect herself regardless of where she was. Benefit Number One "– Legal Protection" : Proper legal representation across state lines would be a big benefit to passing national reciprocity for permit holders. Carrying a firearm for self-defense means taking your safety seriously and making it your priority. It also means dealing with a mess of firearm laws. Shaneen Allen was capable of protecting herself with her gun from violent thugs, but US Gun laws failed her to protect her from vicious prosecutors and ridiculous laws. National Concealed Carry reciprocity will prevent people from going through what Shaneen Allen had to go through by simply crossing a line. National Concealed Carry reciprocity would protect users legally, while they protect themselves physically. This isn’t just beneficial to the individual concealed carrier, but to the state, and county in general. Cases brought against normal law-abiding citizens who make a harmless mistake are bound to add to an already overburdened court system. Plus, the cost to prosecute, and jail a concealed carrier for doing nothing more than carrying a firearm is an astronomical waste of public funds. Benefit Number Two – Self-Protection: The threat of a violent attack does not end just because a person crosses a particular state’s line. National Concealed Carry reciprocity would allow legal and lawful gun owners to carry their firearms from state to state legally. Concealed carriers will no longer have to disarm and make themselves open to violent attacks. This is especially true for states that are restrictive on the right to carry a firearm. States like Illinois and Maryland make it difficult to carry a firearm for self-defense, even though Baltimore and Chicago are some of the most dangerous cities. In general, National Reciprocity may also help lower crime rates nationwide. Criminals tend to fear an armed populace and because of that, they will never really know who is armed and who is not. Crimes against tourists, particularly robberies, are bound to be lower when perps start getting perforated. "Benefit Number Three" – Freedom in Anti Gun States: National Concealed Carry reciprocity will not cause states to change their licensing rules and restrictions. It will merely allow a concealed carry license to be valid in every state. This allows people in states like California to obtain an out of state permit. States like Florida issue nonresident permits that have the same power as a resident permit. Without National Concealed carry reciprocity a Florida nonresident permit means nothing to a California citizen. Since the permit does not have reciprocity in California. A California resident with an out of state permit cannot carry in California. With National concealed carry reciprocity, it will still be difficult to obtain a California concealed carry permit. However, a California resident can obtain a Florida nonresident permit, and because of National reciprocity, they could then carry in their state legally. National Reciprocity could effectively bring the ‘Bear’ portion of keep and bear arms to states that often deny their citizens their rights. "One Major Caution" : National Concealed Carry Reciprocity is largely an excellent idea. The downsides to it are solely on the anti-gun side and their innate fear of legal concealed carry. As concealed carriers, it is critical to remember different states and their laws Some states outright ban magazines that allow a weapon to hold more than ten rounds. New Jersey bans hollow points for concealed carry. These laws will still be in place after National Concealed Carry reciprocity is implemented. While National reciprocity will allow people to carry firearms in their state, the laws regarding firearms, in general, will still apply. This is also important when it comes to carrying a weapon via vehicle. Some state laws are very specific on how to carry in a vehicle regardless of a concealed carry permit or not. Some states also utilize a duty to retreat versus a right to stand your ground. These are all important laws to understand and to know before a concealed carrier travels to a different state. Parting Shots: National reciprocity could extremely beneficial to not just gun owners, but to Americans in general. Criminals in anti-gun states will no longer be sure if their victim is armed or not. Law-abiding citizens will no longer be harassed when they cross imaginary lines, and will no longer be forced to surrender their firearms. National reciprocity will prevent crime in two ways. Citizens carrying firearms legally will no longer be prosecuted for victimless crimes, and criminals will be less likely to bother armed individuals. The current push for National Concealed Carry Reciprocity is looking to be the most successful push yet.

The Best Shotgun Ammo For Home Defense and Target Shooting

The Best Shotgun Ammo For Home Defense and Target Shooting

When law enforcement storms an enclosed area or building, better believe that one of the officers is carrying a shotgun. Capable of blasting assailants at close range, no weapon is more feared than the shotgun . If you are looking for a weapon to strike fear into the hearts of a home intruder, the shotgun is an ideal choice. However, you have many different choices when it comes to shotgun ammunition. In the following article, we will look at some of the most popular choices for shotgun ammunition, helping you find round best suited to your situation. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 What to Look for in a Shotgun 2 What to Look for in Shotgun Ammunition 3 Shotgun Shell Options 4 Conclusions What to Look for in a Shotgun Shotguns, alongside handguns, are among the best options for home defense. When considering a shotgun for home defense, keep in mind the limits of the length of the barrel, as well as the kickback. When shooting at close-quarters, you don’t need to be overzealous. First, you need to choose the right home defense shotgun. Typically, when people talk about personal defense guns they are referring to a tactical shotgun . Generally speaking, you are looking for a shotgun that’s easy to maneuver, as you will be using the weapon at close range. The police and the military offer many different models designed for such situations. Remember, you aren’t shooting at a long distance, so you can afford a shorter barrel. Just make sure that the barrel abides within federal and statutory regulations. What to Look for in Shotgun Ammunition There are three main types of shotgun ammunition . Before discussing them, let’s quickly go over some important shotgun terminology . Shotgun ammunition differs according to the following terms: Gauge: This metric measures the size of the shotgun. It measures the diameter of the barrel. Although you would think that diameter would be a measurement of length, gauge is actually a measurement of weight. It refers to the weight of the shell itself. This term comes from the way that cannons were measured according to the weight of the cannon ball that would fit into the barrel . A twelve-gauge shotgun will fit a round that weighs one-twelfth of a pound. Shot: the term shot refers to the type of pellet contained within the shell, the pellets that the shotgun fires in a spread. These pellets are numbered according to the size of the pellet. Birdshot is the smallest, buckshot the largest. They are measured in terms of their diameter. Birdshot Birdshot will have smaller pellets that will make a much larger spread. Birdshot lacks the lethality of buckshot, but will definitely make sure that you hit something. If you are looking to inflict quick damage, birdshot is an ideal choice. However, it lacks the lethality of buckshot. Here’s what birdshot looks like when fired into ballistics gel: This means that you will not have the lethality needed to stop an attacker. If you are more concerned with disrupting an intruder or scaring away an ex-boyfriend, you might prefer birdshot. However, this doesn’t mean that birdshot is non-lethal. It can often mortally wound an attacker. However, birdshot lacks the penetrating power you need to put a stop to an attacker (as evidenced by the ballistic gel), making it an inferior choice for killing power. Birdshot also has the advantage of being the cheapest shotgun ammo as well. So the next time you hit the range to blow up some pop cans or tannerite , target birdshot loads will be the way to go. Buckshot A buckshot round will deliver much larger pellets. This amplifies the lethality of the round significantly. Police often use a 0 or 00 buckshot rounds for close encounters. Buckshot will have significantly more firepower, packing a lethal punch. Notice the significant difference in power when buckshot is fired into ballistics gel: Most people arming themselves for home defense prefer lethality. If you are looking to kill an intruder immediately, buckshot will deliver the coup de grâce . A 00 buckshot round has eight or nine pellets. Each pellet is about eight and a half millimeters wide. Any of these pellets will cause significant damage or injury, mortally wounding any intruder in almost every case. Such pellets are customer tailored for self-defense, as well as hunting larger animals, packing your shotgun with the punch it needs to deliver a killing blow. Although birdshot works well for hunting, it lacks the instant lethality necessary for home defense. Despite the lack of lethality, the fact that birdshot can often mortally wound an intruder also makes it less ideal for people looking to inflict non-lethal damage, such as officers looking to slow a suspect or those whose moral principles prohibit them from taking a life. Non-lethal damage is best inflicted with rubber pellets. Slugs A shotgun slug carries a large hunk of metal, rather than pellets. Police typically switch to slugs when firing at a further range. Here’s a picture of a slug: As you can see, the round contains a large hunk of metal. The metal is grooved to give you a rifling effect for increased accuracy. This lets to repurpose your shotgun for distance shooting. While not a bad idea to use as an option, if you are dealing with an intruder, typically you are dealing with him or her at close range. If a person is far enough away that you would need to use a slug, they are far enough away not to pose a threat, so you shouldn’t be shooting at them anyways. "Shotgun Shell Options" 1. Options for Birdshot Birdshot works better for target shooting than home defense. Birdshot is probably only viable for when you want to avoid damaging your walls or neighbors when firing in your apartment. Let’s look at some of the different options: #8 Birdshot: These rounds penetrate less than five inches into ballistics gel. The recommended amount for lethality is twelve to eighteen inches. This makes it much too weak. #4 Birdshot: These rounds tend to make it up to about seven inches into the gel, making it much less than ideal. #2 Birdshot: These make it slightly past ten inches, giving it a much better improvement over #8, but still not quite the punch necessary. These will definitely stop an intruder, but not enough to prevent him or her from squeezing off a few additional rounds. Options for Buckshot Buckshot delivers the blow you need to stop an intruder. Just remember never to point your gun at someone unless you intend to pull the trigger. Buckshot is extremely lethal, and not to be used lightly. #4 Buckshot A round of #4 buckshot delivers over fourteen inches of penetration into the ballistics gel. This is definitely within an acceptable range, but not as powerful as a 00 round. Consider using #4 buckshot for apartment complexes or if you are worried about damaging furniture. This is the minimum you want to use for a tactical situation. #1 Buckshot A number one buckshot round will deliver a much bigger punch, sending pellets as far as sixteen inches into a ballistics gel pack: This makes the number one a decent choice as well, giving you the lethality you need for a tactical situation. Best shotgun ammo brands to consider for target shooting: Fiocchi – 25 Rounds – #8 2-3/4″ Estate – 25 Rounds – #8 2-3/4″ 00 Buckshot The 00 buckshot is used by most law enforcement agencies. It gives you what you need for guaranteed lethality, making it highly recommended for home use. On average, 00 buckshot will penetrate twenty inches of ballistics gel. As can be seen in the image, a 00 buckshot round will exceed the 18 inch minimum, giving you an extra punch of lethality. It’s going to be the standard choice for a law enforcement tactical situation, and you should definitely consider it as an option. Buckshot ammo options to consider: #4 Buckshot : Federal Vital-Shok and Federal Power Shok are two great options to consider for shooting around thin walls. #1 Buckshot : The Winchester Super-X is a great ammunition option for #1 Buckshot, as well as the military version. 00 Buckshot: There are many viable options here for self-defense, including the Federal Tactical LE with flight control, as well as other military and federal brands. Options for Slugs A slug will give you twenty-seven degrees of penetration. Nevertheless, we don’t recommend it for shooting at close range. Some slugs to consider: Federal – 5 Rounds – 2-3/4″ Rifled Slug Winchester – 5 Rounds – 2-3/ "4″ Rifled Slug" Fiocchi – 10 Rounds – 2-3/4″ Slug (Low Recoil) Conclusions We hope that we have helped you understand the basics of shotgun ammunition, helping you learn to make the right choice for home defense. To quickly recapitulate the results, we looked at the different kinds of birdshot, buckshot, and slugs. We suggested that buckshot is the superior choice for a tactical situation, as slugs are designed for close range while birdshot is designed for less lethality. That’s why we recommend using buckshot, especially in the 00 range, for a tactical situation. Did we miss any important ammo types for shotguns? Drop a note in the comments and let us know! Related Reads: Shotgun Scabbards Shotgun Scopes Shotgun Silencer Best Semi-auto Shotguns Mod Your Shotgun Finest Shotgun Sights Best Over And Under Shotgun Best Shotgun For Beginners Shotguns For Home Defense Shotgun Shell 4.8/5 (5 Reviews) Chris Browning Hey everyone I'm Chris. Founder and editor at Gun News Daily. This site was originally started by my father who passed it on to me. "Gun News Daily" has been reporting on gun news and conservative politics since 2001. We are the original gun news source. Life-long Second Amendment Supporter. 3 COMMENTS gw February 13, 2018 at 7:56 am buckshot produces tight patterns at close range (10 yards and in) it acts much like a pre-fragmented slug and must be aimed foster type slugs at close range tend to fragment and and typically fail to perforate a target (over penetrate) the slug allows for controlled placement (advantage) buckshot can produce flyers that fail to make contact with the intended target, creating risk downrange ( there is a price tag for everything you throw downrange) slugs are almost a perfect close range stopper, extremely affective buckshot might work better on moving targets, but throw unaccounted for shot downrange no free lunch….. Reply Tim May 11, 2019 at 5:44 pm I am considering a new shotgun for home defense and hunting. I am wondering what good reduced recoil loads exist for 12 guage? Reply Kory Black December 29, 2019 at 6:20 pm Wow! I just recently obtained a Mossberg 12 guage for home defense. Asked for advice from my father in law about ammo and he suggested reading up on the different types of shells. This article is exactly what I needed. You broke this down and I now know what to buy. Excellent article. Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

The M1 Garand: A Legendary American Military Rifle Used in WWII

Advertisment General Patton once called the M1 Garand, “the greatest battle implement ever devised.” And in fact, the M1 is a legendary American rifle . John Garand, a Canadian born weapon designer, created the M1 Garand. Soon, it became a staple of the American military.  It was one of the most widely used rifles, outside of a properly equipped AR-15 . The M1 Garand became a favorite of the troops that wielded it. At the time, it was the premier battle rifle in World War II, and far better than the rifles the Axis powers carried . The M1 allowed the United States to adopt a maneuver-based warfare system utilizing fire and maneuvers to conquer the German and Japanese forces. The M1 Garand is still used by many firearms enthusiasts today, and you can still find working versions being used by hunters and recreational shooters across the United States. Contents The Designer of the M1 Garand A History of an American Legend The M1903 Vs. the M1 Garand Into the Beach: The M1’s First Battle The Marines and the M1 Garand The M1 After WWII The M1 Serves in Korea The M14 in Service & M1 Variants Where the M1 Garand Sits Now The Designer of the M1 Garand This is John C Garand, the creator of the M1 Garand. John Garand worked in a shooting gallery where he first learned about firearms. From there, his interest in firearms and rifles grew rapidly. He became a hobbyist and started building rifles, which eventually led him to employment with Springfield Armory. The Springfield Armory of today has nothing in common with the Springfield Armory of the early 20th century. At the time of John Garand, the Springfield Armory was a United States government armory that designed and built firearms for the United States military. John Garand got the position by entering a design for his own light machine gun. The military chose his gun and appointed him to the Bureau of Standards. Although they never adopted his light machine gun, the Armory retained him after the end of World War I. John Garand was tasked with designing and building a semi-automatic infantry rifle . The system had to be gas-operated and self-loading. Over the next 15 years, John Garand worked to build the design to U.S. Army specs. A History of an American Legend When Garand was designing a rifle for the Army, the bolt action repeater was still the preferred weapon of armies around the world. The idea of a semi-automatic full-powered rifle wasn’t even a blip on the radar of most militaries. So, John Garand was largely starting from nothing to design and build his rifle. He produced several models and prototypes of the M1, but each seemed to fail over time. They put the Garand rifle against the currently issued M1903 bolt action rifle that Pederson and Thompson designed. The Garand rifles were constantly competing with the Pederson, Bang and Thompson rifles. They had not fully defined the caliber at the time, so there were obscure rounds like the 276 Pedersen , the 256 Bang , and the 30 Thompson. The Army did more testing on rifles from Thompson , Colt, Browning, Pedersen, dropping the 30 caliber for the 276. After this second round of trials, they decided that work on the 30 caliber Garand would resume. This wasn’t the end of the Army going back and forth on caliber selection. However, they would eventually choose the 30 caliber as the round for the M1 Garand. In 1932, after decades of different calibers and rifles, Adjutant General John Shuman ordered work of the 276 caliber to end and to pursue the 30 caliber M1. The U.S. Army’s requirements and constantly changing demands limited John Garand. He persevered with patience, eventually succeeding. In 1932, he patented the semi-automatic, 30 caliber M1 Rifle. In 1936, the Army approved the M1. The United States Army put the M1 Garand into mass production in 1940. With the upcoming entry into World War II, the M1 was a relatively untested rifle. There weren’t any small conflicts between its design and World War II where they could identify and solve any issues. In the late 1930s, there were several issues with the gas system in the early Garand rifles. They had to remove and these rifles three years into production. So the fear of a rifle that had never been in battle while going into the biggest war the world had ever seen was a natural emotion to have. This put expectations for the M1 Garand quite high. If it failed, the United States Army infantry would be stuck with a bad rifle. If the M1 had issues, many soldiers would lose their lives. The stakes were high because the M1 Garand replaced the M1903 bolt action rifle . The M1903 Vs. the M1 Garand The M1 Garand is an American Classic. The M1903 was a proven rifle but it was outdated compared to the M1. This is because the M1903 was a bolt action rifle. This means after firing a round, the user had to manually operate the bolt. The M1903 utilized the 30-06 round like the M1 from a five-round internal magazine . However, the internal magazine of the M1 Garand utilized stripper clips to rapidly reload the internal magazine. The M1903 served the country well through numerous wars, including World War I, as well as several small skirmishes around the world. They still used the M1903 in World War II in support roles as a sniper rifle and grenadier weapon. "The United States" Marines, also being the poorest service, carried the 1903 as their main infantry rifle at the beginning of the war. The M1 was a 30-06 rifle that was semi-automatic. A semi-automatic rifle means the weapon fires, ejects and reloads with a squeeze of the trigger . The M1 Garand had an internal eight-round magazine that was fixed to the rifle. Also, it utilized eight-round En Bloc clips and reloaded extremely fast. The M1 was much easier to reload than the M1903. The En Bloc clips are also stronger than typical stripper clips. The M1 Garand has an effective rate of fire of 40 rounds per minute. The M1 was suited as both a highly accurate marksman’s rifle and as a squad support rifle because of its higher fire rate. It’s important to note that although the M1 was an Army issued rifle, the size of WWII meant that they were still using the M1903 in the early parts of the war. There was a famous story of the Marines seeing the M1 and being furious they were still fighting with the M1903. Into the Beach: "The M1’s First" Battle Beside the M1903, the M1 Garand made its premiere in Operation Torch, an invasion of North Africa by the Allied forces. The M1 proved to be a reliable, capable weapon even in the harsh African environments. Operation Torch was a success because the allies opened up a way for the invasion of Sicily. The M1 Garand was truly tested in the D-Day invasion. The beaches of Normandy would be a nightmare for any weapon’s reliability. Beaches have two things that can stop any rifle, even the most modern rifles. Sand and saltwater. Wet sand sticks to everything and gets everywhere. Wet sand and saltwater could stop a lesser weapon, but the Normandy invasion was a success. Part of this success was due to the M1 Garand and its ability to put a massive amount of fire on targets. The M1 was massively successful in the European theatre. It changed the way they fought wars because it made battles and wars move faster. This meant they didn’t need miles of trenches like the Army did in World War I. The M1 Garand caused militaries around the world to reevaluate their small arms. Both the Germans and Russians produced semi-automatic rifles in the middle of the war. Therefore, the bolt action was dead, and the self-loading rifle became the future of warfare. The Marines and the M1 Garand Many people believe the Marines as being the smallest and the worst-equipped branch of the U.S. military. They also cling hard to tradition. This produces a culture that sticks to the past and slowly accepts the future. So, the Marines initially preferred the M1903 Springfield because they already used them with 30 years of success. The M1903 Springfield was the main battle rifle when the Pacific campaign started. The M1903 served well, but the M1 would have given the Marines a serious advantage at the beginning of the campaign. They formally adopted the M1 Garand in 1941, but the Marines didn’t have enough of them to equip all the troops. It wasn’t until after the Guadalcanal campaign that the Marines received the M1 in large numbers. In 1943, the Marines were finally issuing the M1 as the standard infantry rifle. In the Battle of Tarawa, the Marines faced one of the biggest oppositions of the Pacific campaign. The M1 Garand offered the Marines a substantial advantage over the Japanese Arisaka rifles. After numerous bloody skirmishes around the island of Tarawa, the Marines were victorious. The Marines came to love the M1 for its power, reliability and rapid rate of fire. In the Pacific campaign, close-quarters battle was common, and ambushes were a daily occurrence. The M1 Garand’s fire rate helped the Marines break ambushes and succeed in taking island after island. The M1 is immortalized by the picture of the flag-raising on Iwo Jima. The rifle is the only weapon easily visible in the picture of the flag-raising. And that simple picture has been turned into a memorial and monument at Parris Island, with the M1 Garand immortally present. The M1 After WWII After World War II ended, the M1 remained the American service rifle. It served occupational forces in post-war Japan and Europe. Military forces around the world adopted, cloned and copied the rifle. The Greeks, Japanese, Danish, Norwegians, Turkish and dozens of other countries received M1’s from the United States. They built some of them in foreign factories. The rest of the world quickly adopted semi-automatic and fully automatic rifles. The M1 Serves in Korea They called the M1 back into war in the early 1950s. The Korean conflict was growing rapidly and the American forces needed a reliable weapon. And the M1 Garand proved to be successful once more against their bolt action rifles. The M1 served in the frozen Chosin and in amphibious landings. It worked well in snow, sleet, and mud, too. The M1 proved the semi-automatic firearm was the best option in modern warfare. After Korea, the military wanted to create a more modern rifle. They held contests once more between different rifles and in different calibers. Eventually, they chose a new caliber as well as a new rifle. This new rifle is quite familiar. In fact, the M14 was quite similar to the M1. In fact, the M14 is essentially a hybrid of the M1 Garand and M1 Carbine. Several parts of the M1 Garand made their way to the M14, so the rifle lived on. The M14 in Service & M1 Variants The U.S. Army officially adopted the M14 as their service rifle in 1959. However, they were still using the M1 Garand in limited numbers well into the Vietnam war. The M1 was a common sight on Navy ships who didn’t receive the more modern M14. The friendly ARVN troops in Vietnam also got the M1 Garand. By the end of the war, they would replace the M1 and M14 entirely with the M16 rifle. Even the ARVN troops received the M16 rifle by the end of the war. The standard M1 Garand was the most popular model of the M1 rifle. It was the general issue battle rifle for two wars, which they produced in the millions. However, there were a few variants that bear mentioning. The M1C and M1D rifle were sniper variants of the M1 rifle. The M1 was an inherently accurate rifle and well-suited for a sniper role. The biggest difference between the M1C and M1D is the scope mount. The differences between the standard M1 and sniper models are many. The sniper variants had optics on them. They also outfitted these rifles with a conical flash suppressor to keep the shooter hidden. They also designed a carbine model they called the T26 or the tanker model. Although they produced at least one model, they never fielded the tanker models. However, numerous commercial variants of tanker models exist. Where the M1 Garand Sits Now While the M1 doesn’t currently serve in the U.S. military, the M14 still sees limited use. However, the M1 Garand serves as a ceremonial rifle and on shooting teams throughout the military. But the M1 still shows up in conflict zones around the world, including Afghanistan and Iraq. The M1 changed the world in terms of small arms. Many U.S. civilians use the M1 Garand. It remains a popular rifle and an essential part of American history.

7 Best .22 LR Rifles [2020]: Bigger Isnt Always Better

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The .22LR is a great starter rifle for new gun enthusiasts and is still a staple for veteran firearm aficionados. .22LR (CCI vs Winchester vs Super Colibri) It’s a great general purpose rifle for pleasure shooting, hunting, and home defense. .22LR Ammunition is affordable and easy to find.  Plus, the caliber’s small size, especially when compared to the size of a rifle, makes it manageable for even small shooters. If She Can Do It, So Can You Because .22 rifles are so popular, every manufacturer makes at least one . Many make several.  So with the market so flooded with .22 LR rifles, how do you know which one is right for you? That’s where this list comes in.  Here I’ve assembled several of the best .22 rifles available. Best .22 LR Rifles 1. Marlin Model 60 Having been in continuous production for almost 60 years (though it’s now made by Remington) and is, according to the manufacturer, the most popular firearm of its kind in the world. Marlin Model 60 170 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 170 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The Model 60 features a hardwood stock with walnut finish, full pistol grip, and Mar-Shield finish. It also has a brass inner magazine tube with a 14 shot capacity.  If you can find one manufactured before 1968, you can expect an 18 round capacity. Marlin Model 60 with Open Bolt The Model 60 is self-loading with right side ejection (sorry, lefties), a straight blowback design, and both manual and automatic “last- shot” bolt hold open.  Above the trigger is the cross-bolt safety, easily accessible for even small handed shooters. Some shooters have complained that the gun is slow to reload, but the high capacity and corrosion resistance of the brass magazine help counterbalance this flaw. Another high point is 19” micro-groove barrel.  The 16 shallow grooves and quality crown make the rifle very accurate.  In addition, there’s an adjustable rear sight and open front sight, plus grooving in the receiver for mounting a scope. Marlin Model 60C with Camo Finish In addition to the classic finish, the Model 60 is available with the same specs in the Model 60C ($190) with camo finish and the Model 60SN ($160) with matte black finish. Marlin Model 60SN with Matte Black Finish The Model 60SB ($210) features a stainless steel barrel, an adjustable semi-buckhorn folding rear sight, and a ramp front sight with high-visibility post and cutaway Wide-Scan hood. The Model 60SS ($250) also has improved sights, but with a silver wood finish. Marlin Model 60SS with Silver Wood Finish At well under $200 for the standard model, the Marlin Model 60 is a great choice for both new shooters and longtime firearm enthusiasts on a budget. Marlin Model 60SB 2. Henry AR-7 Survival Rifle This rifle was originally designed in 1959 for use by the United States Air Force but is now a favorite among civilians for all the same reasons it was popular with military pilots. Best Survival .22 LR Rifle Henry AR-7 Survival Rifle 230 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 230 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The AR-7 Survival Rifle is lightweight (only 3.5 lbs.), reliable, and compact.  It’s also highly portable thanks to its ability to be disassembled and has all parts of the rifle stored in the impact resistant and water resistant stock. Henry AR-7s While the full length of the assembled gun is 35”, the AR-7 Survival Rifle is only 16” long when all components are stowed.  That’s small enough to fit in almost any backpack or the cargo area of even small planes and boats. AR-7 Innards Assembly is also incredibly easy.  All you have to do is attach the receiver to the stock, insert the barrel, and tighten the nut.  No tools are needed. AR-7 Parts The hardy stock is made of durable ABS plastic with a rubber buttplate pad.  The 16” barrel is comprised of a steel liner surrounded by a composite housing, while the receiver is cast from aluminum.  The entire rifle is Teflon coated.  Like all Henry firearms, the AR-7 Survival Rifle is made in the United States. Assembled Henry AR-7 The rifle features an adjustable peep rear sight and fixed blade front sight and has a ⅜” grooved receiver for scopability. Plus…it shoots pretty nicely. The AR-7 Survival Rifle comes with two eight round magazines.  The low capacity is a disadvantage for this rifle, but two mags certainly help make up for it, as does the rifle’s excellent portability. See our full review here . 3. Ruger 10/22 Takedown Ruger claims that the 10/22 Series is the most popular .22 series in the world.  If you look at the Ruger 10/22’s outstanding reputation for durability and reliability, Ruger’s claim isn’t at all surprising.  Today, however, we want to specifically focus on the 10/22 Takedown. Best Ruger 10/22 Ruger 10/22 Takedown, Stainless 350 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 350 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing S imilar to the Henry Survival Rifle AR-7 in that it can also be taken apart and reassembled with incredible ease and convenience.  However, instead of storing within its own stock, the Ruger 10/22 Takedown comes with a backpack style storage case in which it can be stowed.  In addition to the rifle, the case has room for ammunition and accessories. Ruger 10/22 Takedown with Included Case This gives the Takedown the same storage convenience as the Henry Survival AR-7, but it’s not as protected from moisture or impact unless you store it in a different case. On the other hand, the 10/22 Takedown has a higher capacity, with a removable 10 round magazine.  Some reviewers also claim that the Takedown is more reliable, though both rifles are highly dependable. The Ruger 10/22 Takedown is available in two barrel lengths, an 18.5” barrel and a 16.62” barrel ($350).  The 18.5” barrel option features a brushed aluminum receiver designed to look like stainless steel.  The 16.62” barrel option has a black alloy receiver.  Both are heavier than the Henry AR-7.  The 18.5” barrel option weighs 4.67 lbs., while the 16.62” barrel option weighs in at 4.3 lbs. Ruger 10/22 Takedown with 18.5″ Barrel Regardless of length, the threaded rifle is precision rifled and cold hammer forged.  Both length options have a black synthetic stock. Ruger 10/22 Takedown with 16.62″ Barrel The Ruger 10/22 Takedown also features a positive, push button, cross bolt manual safety and a combination scope base adapter for both Weaver-style and .22 tip-off scope mounts. And like other 10/22 models…there’s an awesome amount of upgrades . Fully Upgraded 10/22 What’s your take on the Ruger? Readers' Ratings 4.85/5 (834) Your Rating? 4. CZ-455 Ame r ican O ne of the newest in the CZ-455 lineup, the American is a follow up to another great .22 rifle, the CZ-452.  While the 455 American doesn’t have the long history of the Marlin Model 60 or the collapsibility of the Henry AR-7 Survival Rifle or Ruger 10/22 Takedown.  What it does have, however, is just as neat. Most Accurate Starter .22 LR Rifle CZ-455 American 400 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 400 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The CZ-455 American’s interchangeable barrel system allows you to shoot several calibers for the price of a single rifle.  While the rifle may not have the stowability of the Henry AR-7 Survival Rifle or Ruger 10/22 Takedown, it saves space by fulfilling the purposes of multiple rifles in one. Barrels are easy to switch out, using twin set screws to fix the barrel into the frame. The CZ-455 American is available with barrels chambered for .22 LR ($400), .22 WMR ($420), .17 HMR ($420).  You can also purchase the CZ-455 American with both .22 LR and .17 HMR barrels included ($530). And, if you just want additional barrels, you can buy .22 LR ($123), .22 WMR ($134), and .17 HMR ($134) barrels individually, each with a 5 round capacity polymer magazine of the corresponding caliber included, as well as the necessary spacer and tools. CZ-455 American Disassembled with Barrels and Magazines Furthermore, actions can be swapped between any CZ-455 stock, not just among models from the American series for even greater interchangeability. Each barrel is 20.5” long and cold hammer forged steel with a sporter taper.  The stock is American style constructed from Turkish walnut and is designed for use with telescopic sights via an 11 mm dovetail rail along the top of the receiver.  The CZ-455 American has an adjustable trigger mechanism and two position safety. The CZ-455 American is one of the larger guns on this list.  It has an overall length of 38.2” and weighs in at 5.85 lbs. CZ-455 American with Suppressor Ready Barrel For those who want a quieter shot, the CZ-455 American is also available with a suppressor ready 16.5” barrel ($400), chambered for .22 LR. 5. Smith & Wesson M&P 15-22 Sport Lacking the more classic look that most of our other rifles possess, the M&P 15-22 stands out from the other .22 rifles on this list because of its AR styling. Smith & Wesson M&P 15-22 Sport 380 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 380 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing However, the M&P 15-22 Sport is considerably more lightweight than an actual AR, only 4.8 lbs, because of its use of polymer, rather than aluminum, for the upper and lower receivers, as well as the proprietary 25 round capacity magazine ($22). Smith & Wesson M&P Magazine Other than its badass appearance, one advantage of the AR styling is that the M&P 15-22 Sport features a 10” handguard which incorporates Magpul’s M-LOK system.  This allows M&P 15-22 Sport rifle owners to customize their rifle with any M-LOK compatible accessories without removing the handguard. M&P 15-22 Sport rifle owners are also able to mount Picatinny rails for even further accommodation of accessories.  One 2” rail is included with purchase. Smith & Wesson M&P 15-22 Sport Rail System In short, the M&P 15-22 Sport is compatible with most standard AR-15 components and accessories. Additionally, the M&P 15-22 Sport features Magpul MBUS sights, a six position CAR stock, and a functional charging handle.  The rifle has a two-position receiver mounted safety lever, as well as a shell deflector. Smith & Wesson M&P 15-22 Sport Matte Black Ultimately, the M&P 15-22 Sport is a great firearm either for training shooters new to the AR world, or just for those who want an alternatively styled or particularly accessory friendly .22 rifle. Smith & Wesson M&P 15-22 Sport in Khaki In addition to the classic Armorite finish, the Smith & Wesson M&P 15-22 Sport is available in matte black , khaki , and Muddy Girl camo ($450) finishes. Smith & Wesson M&P 15-22 Sport Muddy Girl 6. Browning 22 Semi-Auto Rifle Wrapping up our list is the classically styled the SA-22 is another takedown rifle, disassembling into two parts, the buttstock/receiver and forearm/barrel.  A mounted scope is able to stay in place when the rifle is disassembled, saving shooters time and energy by eliminating the need to re-zero the sight. Browning 22 Semi-Auto Rifle 550 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 550 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The one downside here is that the SA-22 neither self-stows or includes a carrying case, so you may need to purchase a case separately. Disassembled Browning SA-22 The SA-22 features a stock and forearm made from checkered American walnut with a glossy finish as well as a blued steel receiver and trigger mechanism. The 19.25” barrel is precision rifled and drilled to accept a scope mount, though the receiver is not. Browning SA-22 With Leupold Scope The rifle has a gold bead front sight and adjustable folding leaf rear sight. And unlike other rifles on this list, the Browning SA-22 has a bottom brass ejection, making it a great choice for lefties and ambidextrous shooters. Closing Thoughts There you have it, six of the best .22 rifles on the market, each with its own unique qualities that help it stand out from the crowd.  These aren’t the only good .22 rifles, but they are tried and true workhorse from some of the best gun manufacturers in the industry. That said, I also want to give a special shout-out to the 7th pick…the Henry Golden Boy.  The Golden Boy is as good as any gun on this list, but we’ve given Henry lots of attention lately, so I wanted to limit this list to only one Henry rifle.  You can check out Eric’s recent review of the Golden Boy for more (and more detailed) info. Henry Golden Boy Now here’s your chance to let us know what you think. What’s your favorite .22 rifle?  What is your favorite all-purpose gun?  Check out our list of the Best .22LR Pistols and our Favorite .22LR Ammo for plinking, accuracy, and stealth

Summary

KRISS USA, innovators of the Super V Recoil Mitigation System, is announcing the re-release of California Compliant KRISS® Vector GEN II firearms. These updated models will be available in all calibers and colors, and shipping to California dealers starting in April 2017, with an MSRP of $1,599. 00.